Day 85

So today i have yet to knit…can’t decide which yarn yet.Today i’ve done something which i have  never done before…i went to the cinema by myself to see a film i had wanted to watch for the best part of this year.I have never been to the cinema by myself before……great experience.What a film……Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1588895/

Before the film i had some time to spare so i went to the Foundling Museum

http://www.foundlingmuseum.org.uk/

http://www.foundlingmuseum.org.uk/exhibit_temp.php

i was lucky to be able to see this exhibition Threads Of Feeling

Fabric swatches from the 18th century tell stories of mother and babies partingThreads of Feeling will showcase fabrics never shown before to illustrate the moment of parting as mothers left their babies at the original Foundling Hospital, which continues today as the children’s charity Coram.

In the cases of more than 4,000 babies left between 1741 and 1760, a small object or token, usually a piece of fabric, was kept as an identifying record. The fabric was either provided by the mother or cut from the child’s clothing by the hospital’s nurses. Attached to registration forms and bound up into ledgers, these pieces of fabric form the largest collection of everyday textiles surviving in Britain from the 18th Century.

A selection of the textiles and the stories they tell us about individual babies, their mothers and their lives forms the focus of the Threads of Feeling exhibition. The exhibition will also examine artist William Hogarth’s depictions of the clothes, ribbons, embroidery and fabrics worn in the 18th Century as represented by the textile tokens.

John Styles Research Professor in History at the University of Hertfordshire received funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council to curate the exhibition. John comments: “The process of giving over a baby to the hospital was anonymous. It was a form of adoption, whereby the hospital became the infant’s parent and its previous identity was effaced. The mother’s name was not recorded, but many left personal notes or letters exhorting the hospital to care for their child. Occasionally children were reclaimed. The pieces of fabric in the ledgers were kept, with the expectation that they could be used to identify the child if it was returned to its mother.

The textiles are both beautiful and poignant, embedded in a rich social history. Each swatch reflects the life of a single infant child. But the textiles also tell us about the clothes their mothers wore, because baby clothes were usually made up from worn-out adult clothing. The fabrics reveal how working women struggled to be fashionable in the 18th Century.”

A very moving exhibition & amazing to see the variety & colour in the textiles from the time.

Photo from the foundling museum .Fabulous exhibit & i went up to the top floor in order to look down the whole length of the ribbons

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